Radiology

Radiology Schools in New York

Imaging is important in helping diagnose illness or injury in patients, and radiologic technologists assist doctors by providing these images through the use of X-rays, ultrasounds, magnetic resonance imaging and other procedures. A postsecondary educational program can teach students the skills needed to pursue a career in radiology, which, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), is a health care career that has been in relatively high demand in recent years. Specific jobs in the field of radiology include:

New York Schools with Radiology Programs

Radiologic technology schools in New York offer a variety of certificates and degrees to prospective students seeking education in the field. Below is a list of just some of the schools in New York that offer radiology programs, according to the National Center for Education Statistics:

  • Adirondack Community College, Queensbury
  • Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Elmira
  • CUNY Bronx Community College, Bronx
  • CUNY LaGuardia Community College, Long Island City
  • CUNY New York City College of Technology, Brooklyn
  • Fulton-Montgomery Community College, Johnstown
  • Hudson Valley Community College, Troy
  • Manhattan College, Riverdale
  • Mohawk Valley Community College, Utica
  • Monroe Community College, Rochester
  • Nassau Community College, Garden City
  • Niagara Community College, Sanborn
  • North County Community College, Saranac Lake
  • Orange County Community College, Middletown
  • Saint Elizabeth Medical Center School of Radiography, Utica
  • St. Francis College, Brooklyn Heights
  • St. John’s University – New York, Queens
  • SUNY Broome Community College, Binghamton
  • SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn
  • SUNY Westchester Community College, Valhalia
  • Trocaire College, Buffalo
  • Upstate Medical University, Syracuse

How to Become a Radiologic Technologist in New York

According to the BLS, an associate degree is typically the entry-level education that’s needed to pursue work in this field, though different radiology jobs or employers might require another level of education, such as a bachelor’s degree. Most levels of education will combine coursework with hands-on clinical experience, which may cover skills such as basic competency in radiographic procedures and the ability to be adaptive in non-routine scenarios. Some topics that students enrolled in radiologic technology schools in New York might study include:

  • Radiographic physics
  • Radiographic pathology
  • Radiographic technology
  • Sectional anatomy

Accreditation by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) is important, as graduation from an accredited program is often a requirement in many state-licensing processes. In New York, state licensure is needed for employment as a radiologic technologist, according to the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT). Passing a state exam or the national exam administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) is acceptable for its licensing process.

Upon licensing, continuing education becomes important and, in New York, includes 48 mandatory hours that must be completed over the next four years. Different states have different licensing requirements, and some even offer license reciprocity, so it may be helpful to take the national exam offered by the ARRT; the ARRT reports that its exam is accepted in 37 states for licensing. However, the New York Department of Health indicates that New York does not offer license reciprocity, meaning that all radiologic technologists need to complete the licensing process in New York if they intend to work within the state.

Radiology Salary in New York

Check out the table below to see the average annual salaries for different radiology professionals in New York, as well as the number of people employed in each job, according to data from the BLS. Keep in mind that salaries may vary based on your employer and location.

Career Total Employment Annual Mean Wage
Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians 3,260 60,670
Diagnostic Medical Sonographers 4,790 74,480
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists 2,140 78,930
Nuclear Medicine Technologists 1,150 84,540
Radiologic Technologists 12,320 68,720

Source: 2016 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2016-26 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov.

Sources

Radiology Programs